SVG uploads in WordPress (the Inconvenient Truth)

Enabling uploads of SVG files in WordPress is quite easy, and there is a tonne of posts on the Interwebs explaining how you do it. Usually along the lines of: function add_svg_to_upload_mimes( $upload_mimes ) { $upload_mimes[‘svg’] = ‘image/svg+xml’; $upload_mimes[‘svgz’] = ‘image/svg+xml’; return $upload_mimes; } add_filter( ‘upload_mimes’, ‘add_svg_to_upload_mimes’, 10, 1 ); And that’s pretty much it.Continue reading “SVG uploads in WordPress (the Inconvenient Truth)”

Run all due cron events for WordPress with WP-CLI

Running a real cronjob is much more reliable than WordPress’ built-in “maybe-will-trigger” solution. But if you’re running a multisite network, you have to add a crontab entry for every site you set up – which is tedious. Thanks to WP-CLI, we can use a small bash script instead, which will run all due events forContinue reading “Run all due cron events for WordPress with WP-CLI”

Block access to PHP files on your WordPress site with Nginx

In your WordPress site, there are directories that include PHP files that visitors should never be able to access directly. They are only there for WordPress to function as an application that runs on your server. But because of WordPress’ directory and file structure, they are kind of accessible to the public. All of themContinue reading “Block access to PHP files on your WordPress site with Nginx”

Using fail2ban to block WordPress login attacks

Fail2ban works by filtering a log file with a regular expression triggering a ban action if the condition is met. After a preset time, it will trigger an unban action. Without much effort, we can have WordPress log all authentication events and have fail2ban react on them.